Advice for Art thieves

Author: Leo Burtin
27th November 2014 at 13:23

Following leading a DIY workshop earlier this year at Live At LICA, Andy Field has been asked by the Live Art Development Agency to contribute to a series of presentations... He gives his top tips for stealing other people's presentations below...

Have you got anything to add, art thieves? 

ADVICE FOR ART THIEVES

Choose a presentation.

1. Surreptitiously record this presentation using the camera on your phone. Learn and re-perform this material as if it is your own.

2. Surreptitiously record this presentation using the camera on your phone. Learn and re-perform this material, but do so as a series of quotations, each wrapped carefully in its own set of quotation marks.

3. Surreptitiously record this presentation using the camera on your phone. Burn that video onto a DVD and sell copies of it on eBay or a nearby pub.

4. Study the form of the presentation. The structure of its argument. The relationship between its constituent parts. Transform those elements into a blueprint that can be usefully employed in a presentation on any subject of your choosing.

5. Listen to the presentation. From the assembled evidence try and glean an understanding of the activity that the presentation is describing. Repeat that same activity as best you can. Having completed that activity deliver your own presentation describing what happened, using the same format as the presentation that you started from.

6. Gather every document, online or in print, pertaining to the presentation. Every document that serves as proof that it exists. Once you have all of these documents, inform the original presenter that you have stolen them, that you have kidnapped their presentation. Inform them that the only way in which they can save that presentation is to meet at a destination of your choosing on a specified date, and re-perform that presentation for your own entertainment.

7. Study the themes of the presentation. Deliver your own presentation reflecting on your response to the same themes, but making sly and fleeting reference to the original presentation that served as your source of inspiration.

8. Watch this presentation only once. Perform it yourself doing your best to copy exactly what was said and done.

9. Employ a set of instructions or distracting interventions as a means of appropriating this presentation to talk about something entirely different.

10. When no one is looking steal the microphone.

©Andy Field, with ideas stolen from Simon Bowes, Deborah Pearson, John Boursnell and Massive Owl

www.andytfield.co.uk